Health Benefits of Radish

Radish is one of the nutritious root-vegetables featured in both salads as well as in main recipes. This widely used root vegetable belongs to the family of Brassica. In Chinese culture, the root along with cabbage and soybean curd (tofu), has been believed as healthful and sustenance food. A popular Chinese proverb goes like this, “eating pungent radish and drinking hot tea, let the starved doctors beg on their knees.”

Radish, that common and beloved part of your salad, is a root crop, and it is pungent or sweet in taste with a lot of juice. Radishes can be white, red, purple or black, and in terms of shape, it can be long and cylindrical or round. They are eaten raw, cooked or pickled. The oil obtained from the seeds of radish is also used in a number of products and beneficial health applications.

The parts of radishes that are commonly consumed are the leaves, flowers, pods and seeds. The scientific name of radish is Raphanus Sativus which belongs to the Brassicaceae family. Radish is also known as Daikon in some parts of the world, primarily in Asian markets.

Radishes are very filling, which mean that they satisfy your hunger without running up your calorie count. They are also low in digestible carbohydrates, high in roughage and contain a lot of water, making radishes a very good dietary option for those who are determined to lose weight.

Furthermore, they are high in fiber and low on the glycemic index, which means that they increase regular bowel movements, which helps in weight loss, and increases the efficiency of the metabolism for all bodily processes.

  • They are are one of very low calorie root vegetables. Fresh root provides just 16 calories per 100 g. Nonetheless; they are a very good source of anti-oxidants, electrolytes, minerals, vitamins and dietary fiber.
  • Radish, like other cruciferous and Brassica family vegetables, containsisothiocyanate anti-oxidant compound called sulforaphane. Studies suggest that sulforaphane has proven role against prostate, breast, colon and ovarian cancers by virtue of its cancer-cell growth inhibition, and cyto-toxic effects on cancer cells.
  • Fresh roots are good source of vitamin C; provide about 15 mg or 25% of DRI of vitamin C per 100 g. Vitamin C is a powerful water soluble anti-oxidant required by the body for synthesis of collagen. It helps the body scavenge harmful free radicals, prevention from cancers, inflammation and help boost immunity.
  • In addition, they contain adequate levels of folates, vitamin B-6, riboflavin, thiamin and minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper and calcium.